Posts tagged ‘timber’

Two videos: Natural disturbance-based silviculture and restoring late-successional structure

Back in June 2009, someone named Tom posted a great question about applying the Dauerwald concept in Minnesota.  In a nutshell, the Dauerwald approach involves intensive management designed to maintain a high diversity of tree species and ages.  This approach can be attractive to those interested in active management but less comfortable with more extensive harvests such as clearcuts or shelterwood treatments.

This month we feature a two-part video response to Tom’s question and the ensuing discussion from Tony D’Amato, silviculturist at the University of Minnesota’s Department of Forest Resources.  Tony’s first video addresses the concept of natural disturbance-based silviculture.  His second video addresses a somewhat related concept, of active management to restore late-successional structure. Tony discusses how ecological forestry can complement other approaches like production forestry and multiple use sustained yield forestry on the landscape.

Ecological forestry: Natural disturbance-based silviculture

Links:

Ecological forestry: Restoring late-successional forest structure

Links:

Your turn

How does (or doesn’t) ecological forestry fit into your woodland plans?  Why or why not?  Leave a comment below or add to the initial discussion begun by Tom.

November 10, 2009 at 6:05 am Leave a comment

Light on the Land Small-scale Logging field day: Sept. 19, Brainerd

Small-scale Logging Field Day: September 19, 2009, Brainerd. Download complete event details (PDF)

Small-scale logging is a system and a range of equipment that increases logging flexibility and extends production seasons.  Small-scale logging is designed for harvesting operations where maneuverability is a primary concern.  It is not logging small trees and/or small volumes.

Why attend?

Whether you are a logger, forester, woodland owner, or other land manager, this field day will show you how to maximize profitability through the use of small-scale logging and harvesting equipment, using efficient and safe techniques.

From tree  to finished product is the main theme of this event, with a focus on the private landowner.

Equipment displays:

  • Peterson swing blade sawmill
  • Mulch-R’Down brush clearing
  • ATV arches
  • Farmi Winch
  • Portable Winch(TM)
  • Log-rite Tools

Informational Displays and Forest Products:

  • Lumber drying
  • Lathe turnings
  • Custom log work
  • Growing mushrooms
  • Maple syrup
  • Silent Auction
  • Wood carving, crafts, furniture,
  • misc. lumber, etc.

For more details, including schedule and registration information, check out the event brochure (PDF) or contact Gary Bradford at (218) 927-4599 or Patrick Lanin at (218) 764-3315.

This event is hosted by Northwoods Forestry Cooperative and the Brainerd Chapter of the Minnesota Forestry Association.

September 10, 2009 at 9:08 am Leave a comment

Finding help: Minnesota woodland professionals

About the many different kinds of Minnesota forestry and natural resource professionals, including public and private sector foresters and loggers. This page will help you choose the right source of professional assistance for your woodland project.

Continue Reading April 29, 2007 at 1:20 pm Leave a comment

Income taxes and Minnesota family forests

Five important considerations affecting income taxes on Minnesota family forests.

Continue Reading April 29, 2007 at 12:40 pm Leave a comment

Harvesting Timber: Overview

An overview of harvesting and selling timber in Minnesota, with links to content on timber harvest contracts, visual impacts, selling timber, the future of your woodlands after harvest, and natural and artificial regeneration.

Continue Reading April 28, 2007 at 8:20 pm Leave a comment

Harvesting and selling timber

A brief overview of different widely accepted methods of selling timber: Lump sum, scale, and percentage. Also links to other useful related sites.

Continue Reading April 28, 2007 at 8:12 pm Leave a comment

Harvesting Timber: The Future of Your Woodland

As you plan a timber sale, it is easy to focus on what can be taken out of the stand.  However, as a landowner committed to the stewardship of your land, you need also to be thinking about what will be left behind.  The trees that remain after the harvest are the ones that you’ll see every time you walk through the woods.  They’re also the seed source for your future woods.

Hardwood logpile in stand

Eli Sagor photo

Every timber harvest should leave the woodland in a better condition than it was beforehand.  This can happen in many different ways.  Partial harvests should be designed to remove less desirable species and trees of relatively poor form.  This will focus growing space on the best of your woodland, improving its vigor, quality, and value.  Partial harvests are also a great way to grow big trees quickly.

The same concept applies to clearcut stands as well.  Well planned and executed timber harvests can greatly improve the productive capacity of the woodlot.  But details do matter.  For example, harvesting aspen in the winter leads to more vigorous new growth.

Why?  In spring and summer, most of the tree’s nutrients are in the growing parts of the tree:  stem, twigs, and leaves.  In winter, nutrients move from leaves to roots, where they’re stored until the next growing season.  If you harvest in winter, these nutrients will be available for a fast, vigorous new growth.  If you harvest in summer, the nutrients will be lost.

Details like this can have important impacts on your timber harvest experience.  Before you harvest, talk to a forester who can help you plan ahead for a successful sale.

April 28, 2007 at 8:05 pm Leave a comment

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News and information of interest to Minnesota woodland owners. Sister site to MyMinnesotaWoods.org.

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