Posts tagged ‘planning’

How Much Does it Cost to Water This Tree?

Water is a biological necessity for all trees, whether in a landscape or woodland setting and must be available over an entire growing season (June through October). Healthy trees are the result of efficient watering; not supplying so much that the roots die from lack of oxygen or too little makes all the difference.

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Continue Reading April 4, 2009 at 6:06 am 1 comment

Small Ownerships: Overview

In addition to limited access to cost-sharing, owners of smaller parcels can be faced with significant forest management challenges. Windstorms, insect outbreaks, and diseases can affect woodlands regardless of boundaries. On smaller parcels though, the costs of treatments to reduce impacts can be prohibitively high. This can lead to less treatment, which can lead to worse outbreaks in the long run.

Continue Reading April 4, 2008 at 4:27 am Leave a comment

Small Ownerships: Family Projects

It doesn’t take much land to have fun in the woods. This page has a few ideas to get the family outside in your woods. In addition to being a fun way to spend family time together, time outside on the land can build interest among the whole family in your land, building interest in long-term stewardship.

Continue Reading April 4, 2008 at 4:27 am 1 comment

Small ownerships: Cross-boundary coordination

The high fixed costs associated with managing small parcels can be spread out across more parcels if you’re able to coordinate your forest stewardship activities with nearby woodland owners. Your forester, logger, or local MFA chapter may be able to help you identify other area landowners who might be interested in collaboration.

Continue Reading April 4, 2008 at 4:26 am Leave a comment

Forest health: Foliage, stem, and branch diseases

Foliage diseases my cause conifer needles to turn yellow or brown or drop prematurely. Hardwood leaves may develop yellow, brown, or black spots. These diseases weaken trees by reducing the ability of leaves to produce plant food.

Continue Reading April 29, 2007 at 7:28 pm Leave a comment

Forest Health: Overview

Forest health is affected by insect outbreaks, diseases, invasive species, regeneration, fire ecology, natural disturbance, and many other factors.

Fungal growth on birch: Jim Frazier photo

Fungal growth on birch: Jim Frazier photo

Not all insects and diseases are bad. Native insects and diseases are a normal part of a healthy forest. An example is the periodic defoliation events from forest tent caterpillars (armyworms). Minnesota forests evolved in the presence of these bugs, and they recover quickly from outbreaks.

On the other hand, non-native, introduced insects, diseases, and plant species pose a serious threat. Invasives must be addressed quickly. Diseases like Dutch elm disease, shrub species like buckthorn, and new invasive insects like Gypsy moth and emerald ash borer can cause serious forest health problems. It’s critical that landowners learn to identify these species quickly and keep their woodlands healthy and free from invaders to the greatest degree possible.

The pages in this section are designed to provide basic information about forest health issues in Minnesota. Probably the best source of forest health information in Minnesota is the Forest Insect & Disease Newsletter, published by the MN DNR Division of Forestry.

As more and more invasives enter our woods, forest health can seem daunting at times. But it’s important that we all maintain vigorous, healthy native woodlands to the greatest degree we can. Most forest health threats are far easier to prevent than to eradicate once they’re established. Good luck! Your neighbors, as well as future generations, will thank you for it.


April 29, 2007 at 7:26 pm Leave a comment

Woodland wildfire and protecting your property

Forest fires are classified as surface, crown, or ground fires based on their manner of spread. Most forest fires in the Midwest are surface fires. They burn only the litter and other small fuels on the forest floor. They may scar the base of large trees and kill small trees.

Continue Reading April 29, 2007 at 2:29 pm Leave a comment

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News and information of interest to Minnesota woodland owners. Sister site to MyMinnesotaWoods.org.

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